MMR Blog

MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on April 11, 2014 Comments (0)

F1

Just when we were expecting the worst, a fine race broke out. This was certainly one of the best races F1 has produced in recent memory. Bahrain is still a Mickey Mouse track but it would have been impossible to duplicate this kind of close racing at Spa. Why do TV racing producers feel compelled to keep the cars racing for the win off of our screens? This is not the first race this year where we are treated to the gripping battle for fifth while the battle for the win is ignored. Meanwhile, Ferrari and Renault need a new plan soon or heads will roll.

Denise McCluggage and Anne Hall in Ford Falcon -- Monte Carlo Rally

But Baby, It’s Cold Outside

It is the 50th Anniversary of Paddy Hopkirk’s Monte Carlo win and our lead image is of Denise McCluggage and co-driver Anne Hall blasting thru the Alps to win the Lady’s Cup and, more important, their class in the 1964 Monte Carlo Rally! Denise also raced and won for Ford in The Shell 4000 Rally in Canada. Read on.

Winter Courting in Quebec

We never really took Summer rallying seriously. We just wanted to drive fast for an hour, find a secluded beach with a campfire and warm beer and neck. Ah necking! It was a far different time.

Winter rallies were different, we would bounce our little AH Sprites at breakneck speeds over snow packed and deeply rutted side roads in the Quebec countryside to finish in some warm little restaurant where we would learn that the winning team, generally driving a Volkswagen Beetle equipped with functional windshield wipers, a heater and a calculator, (The unfair advantage?) had finished an hour ahead of us and we had never even been on the same roads. Then we would fall back into our little cars, race all the way back to St. Jean with one eye glued to a five inch half circle of clear windshield. It is amazing that we lived. Girls wouldn’t come with us on these adventures because, one, they took place on Sunday mornings and they had to go to church, and two, the rallies were stupid and they weren’t. Besides they never necked on Sunday. It was their day off.

Uncommon Classifieds

This week’s classifieds are exceptional. Take a moment to buy one.

Alfas Everywhere!

S. Scott Callan shared images and a vignette about Enzo Ferrari and his days with Alfa—from his book Alfa Romeo: View From the Mouth of the Dragon. This week’s brilliant image of our favorite car (which resides at the Simeone Foundation Museum) is from Michael Furman’s book The Spirit of Competition.

Michael Furman photo

Have a great weekend. Don’t forget to share this with a friend.

Peter Bourassa


My Word: Fifty Years Ago Paddy Won

Posted on April 9, 2014 Comments (1)

But So Did We, With a Falcon!

By Denise McCluggage

The invitation read that fifty years ago Paddy Hopkirk won the Monte Carlo Rally in a Mini Cooper S. To honor that accomplishment there would be a gathering at one of my favorite places, the Candy Store in Burlingame, California. Alas, I sent regrets. Broke a bone the previous month and I’m still hobbling.

It was Paddy’s 80th birthday, too.

I'd been on the BMC (British Motor Corp) rally team along with the incredible Paddy in the early 1960s. Americans on British works teams were rare. Actually nonexistent except for me when it comes to that. Besides BMC I drove for Ford of England and for Rover. And for a couple of American factory teams too—General Motors and Ford. Didn't know they did that sort of thing, did you?

Which brings to mind the year that Paddy took the Mini to victory in the Monte—1964—I also had a bit of a success in that winter dash about the snow-bandaged Alps. In a Ford Falcon no less with Anne Hall, a.k.a. the Flying Yorkshirewoman. Outcome: we won the Lady's Cup and our class. Hey, Ford, remember that? Fifty years ago. The Monte Carlo!

Denise McCluggage and Anne Hall in the Ford Falcon -- Monte Carlo Rally

Well-l-l, never mind the roses. I got a lot of flowers when I broke that bone.

At that time rallies did exist in America but differed greatly from those in Europe. The European rallies were thinly-veiled road races lasting for days. American fans of today’s televised World Rally Championship would not recognize the sedate, intellectually-themed constructs that were American rallies then. Constrained by speed limits and no cultural history, American rallies were mathematical exercises. Time-distance events that depended less on high-performance driving skills and more on the ability for quick calculations, attention to detail, ability to follow instructions and not mess up.

In those contests check points were often unexpected, some even hidden, so adhering to the called-for speed—something like 22.7 mph changing for a few miles to 29.3 then to 30.6 and back—meant being at the correct speed always or risking penalties. Being early could cost even more than being late. Precision mattered and the navigator called the shots.

In Europe, on the other hand, we tried to be as early as possible to the next check point so we could have time for servicing the rally car from the support vehicles, usually station wagons that were driven shorter routes and/or driven as hard as competitors to stake out a spot near the approach to the check point to tend to our needs. Tire changes maybe, headlight aiming, etc. Arriving early was also the only way we could grab a few minutes of sleep or a quick bite of something.

In America the time-distance experts used what technology was available to aid their calculations. The latest thing was a dandy gadget called a Curta calculator. The Curta looked for all the world like a pepper mill right down to its little crank. It was a new twist on the slide rule and used by the brainiacs until computers—not long from being the size of the boy’s gym in junior high—shrank to passenger-seat use. The navigator adept with a Curta was in demand.

Still we scornful philistines who just wanted to drive as unrestrained as possible had figured out the secret to having fun in an American rally. Simply get gloriously lost early on and spend the rest of the event really hanging it out to more or less catch up.

Actually time-distance events are an art form of their own. And fun in their heady way. Some rally proponents, like Satch Carlson, are close to addiction in their devotion to them. I simply prefer the present WRC or the old European model. Didn’t a Harvard president take lots of heat for implying girls weren’t good at math? Sadly, he was right-on in my case. And I missed out on music, too. (I’ll blow a door off if you like.)

The Monte Carlo designated a number of European cities as starting points with all roads aimed for the Alpes-Maritimes, the favored neighborhood for most continental rallies. The teams I drove for seemed to favor Paris for a bon start. All entrants were doing the same transition routes and special stages as we got closer to Monte Carlo.

Studded tires were new about this time and were supposed to be the hot ticket. Studs were obviously best for traction on packed snow. Any further art had not developed to a fine state. The studs in the tires mounted on the Falcon were too long and on the hard ice and the frequent bare pavement they had nothing to dig into. It was like wearing golf shoes on a tile floor. Even worse because the studs were long enough to bend over. The car was all over the place with little rubber ever touching the road surface.

Anne was up to the task as weird as it was and good thing too. We had no time to change tires, even if we could find our support as we plunged down to the Mediterranean. Anne kept on top of the slithers and slides of the Falcon as we hair-pinned the last stretch into Monte Carlo.

The next day with new tires and the studs gone she might have had an easier time going for speed on the course of the Monte Carlo Grand Prix—solo in the car—but Anne’s forte was in the flying elbows of the rallyist of the day. She was a tiger on every turn. Looked fantastic.

So as Paddy and the Mini won the whole thing we took our little part of it, too.

Congratulations to all deserving. And, Happy Birthday Mr. Hopkirk.


Enzo Likes a Ringer

Posted on April 9, 2014 Comments (1)

By S. Scott Callan

As director of the newly minted Alfa Corsa, he had the full foundry and fabrication team at his disposal. He put together a new series of Tipo B (P3) engines, welded up some widened Tipo C GP chassis, they needed a second seat, slapped on some fenders, a couple of lights, some tools might be necessary, made some available to customers in bare chassis for the Carrozzeria to body, and called them sports cars. They were GP cars. And everyone knew it. The Mille Miglia in the late Thirties... for Alfa it was like O’Toole, Harris, and Burton on stage (or in the bars), everyone else was merely supporting cast.

Two Alfas


MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on March 28, 2014 Comments (0)

This week we cover the final day of the 2014 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. As ever, the event was memorable and we hope we have conveyed the experience that awaits those of you who have never been. Consider driving your favorite vehicle to Amelia next year.

Brett Lemoine, MGB enthusiast, member of The Boston Cup management team and budding photographer won our Amelia Photo Contest and several of his images are featured this week. Brett wins a copy of Michael Furman’s most recent book Automotive Jewelry. Congratulation Brett! Well done!

Denise

Denise McCluggage thanks you all for your good wishes and advises that she is getting stronger by the day. Her comments last week on the “green drive” in F1 struck a responsive chord.

Peter Brock writes:

Denise… what a fantastic, beautiful column on F1. Bravo! The incredible stupidity of trying to cram opposing philosophies into a subject like racing started creeping into our sport a few years ago when the ALMS tried going green… It’s never been satisfying and the additional effort to make it all “fair” by “performance balancing” has made it even worse. Since when is it right to penalize success for superior skill, strategy and innovation? Your coda on hearing really made a point as well… I’ve lost about 40% of my hearing, so your comment on hearing aids really resonated… what I miss most is music. Best, Peter Brock

Brian Redman writes:

Great article Denise! Costco have great hearing aids—under $2,000 for the pair! All the best, Brian

Evi & Dan Gurney write:

Hello Denise, we read your perceptive and beautiful piece on the present Formula 1 scene, could not agree with you more but cannot express it as nicely as you did. Lots of love, Evi and Dan

On that note we ask: Is it unreasonable to believe that the F1 establishment is terrified to hang its existence on the fact that F1 could be ENTERTAINING! Must racing have a redeeming social value to survive? 

Racing on TV

2014 Moto GP First Race – Yes! The Doctor IS in the House! At a night time race in Qatar (WHY?), Marquez and Honda won but the veteran Valentino Rossi was a close second on a Yamaha GP bike that was definitely not as quick as he made it. These guys really race.

NASCAR at Fontana. The Auto Club Speedway is a joke. IndyCar are courting a disaster if they go back.

F1 resumes at Malaysia this weekend and IndyCar is at St. Petersburg, Florida for their season opener. Check your local listings for times.

Last Week’s Leak

Several of you commented on the part of the Road to Amelia Article that mentioned the WASRED Ferrari’s leaky Targa top. A friend wrote:

Cars that leak in interesting ways can be entertaining. I think it was my black TC that dripped dripped dripped on my right foot. Then it would suddenly pee in a steady stream. Then nothing for a while. Could never figure out its pathway though.

BMW at Amelia

BMW was the dominant factor at this year’s Amelia event. The Gooding’s Auction offered a brace of them from a private collector, the Calder BME car that began the whole Cars as Art series was there. On Friday they offered a relatively small dinner to honor David Hobbs, one of their most successful drivers. See Dinner with Heroes. On Saturday, several of their successful ‘80s race cars dominated the Cars & Coffee event and on Sunday the same cars drew just as much attention. Bravo BMW! And thank you for doing it.

Your assistance is requested to grow our readership. You are our greatest source of new readers. Please share this with a friend and consider subscribing so you never miss a newsletter.

Have a great motorsports weekend.

Peter Bourassa



BMW Dinner with Heroes

Posted on March 27, 2014 Comments (0)

BMW hosted a small party on Friday Night at Amelia to honor David Hobbs. The guests were the press and other race drivers, some of whom actually drove BMWs. David was very successful driving their race cars in the ‘80s and he and his good friend Sam Posey, who have developed their own version of the Punch and Judy Show, supplied the end of evening entertainment. They were very funny. At the end of the evening all the drivers gathered for a very informal photo op and we thought you might enjoy these images.